Spring Wedding Floral Trends

We may be still on the waiting list for Spring here in Rochester, but soon enough the birds will be singing and the lilacs blooming! Spring weddings are on the rise and here are just a few of the trends in floral design.

{1} Soft Color Pallet: Spring evokes a soft and subtle color scheme as we are waking up from the bleak colors of winter. This bouquet of  quiet “sherbert” hues is perfect for a Spring wedding.

{2} Unexpected Elements: Spring also inspires happiness as we put winter behind us and celebrate a new beginning. These boutonnieres are a perfect mix of subtle and happy with the polka dot feathers added for style and charm.

{3} Seasonal Features: Fall weddings have been making use of pumpkins and corn stalks for many seasons now that we are accepting of a casual esthetic. This new rule works for spring too; umbrellas and pin wheels are perfect details to add to your floral decor.

{4} Let The Sunshine In: Yellow is the perfect color for Spring weddings! It can be soft and bold at the same time, while brightening your day with thoughts of sunshine. I love a yellow wedding especially in the Spring! These round billy balls add another fun element in the yellow color scheme.

See the original herRochester post here.

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Easter Surprises. Unexpected Decor For The Holiday.

With Easter just a hop, skip, and jump aways, decorating for guests is definitely on the mind.  Of course flowers are always our “go-to”, but don’t feel limited to all floral pieces.  Easter and spring in general are a great time to play with alternative add-ins for decorating your home!

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{1} Sweet Treats.  With baskets full of brightly colored candies, we’re so inspired by sweet ad-ins for floral designs.  Think jelly beans, bunny peeps, or chocolate foiled eggs.

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{2} Succulent Surprises.  For a modern twist on traditional Easter floral displays, add in succulents.  These structured, fleshy blooms are perfect for tucking into floral pieces, or simply standing alone.  Our favorite look is succulents tucked into dyed eggs, just like above!

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{3} Grasses Galore.  Spring is finally here (we hope), so showcasing something as simple as grasses might be just the perfect touch.  Wheat grass pared with colorful spring flowers, placed in spring inspired vases, or paired with easter staples like colored eggs with make for a beautiful Easter display.

Easterblog2{4} Veggie-tastic.  Go beyond the traditional norms of floral design and add in some unexpected elements.  Vegetables like radishes, carrots, and lettuce are perfect to keep guests looking twice at your unique design.

7037a7534d04d7c5c97cb64009d5efab{5} Mossy Must Haves.  Moss covered pieces are perfect for subtle touches of easter and spring.  Covering spheres or your favorite Easter shapes in moss is a trend savvy touch to your holiday home decor.

Bring Spring In

It’s no secret, we’re all sick of this cold weather.  And even though we can’t enjoy outdoor flowers just yet, you can bring spring inside.  Here are some of our favorite plants to bring indoors:

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{1} Tulips: A perennial, bulb plant with around 75 wild species.  You can find one in almost any color and many have varying petal types.
247f443f70d207f81033dd65d0da6820{2} Crocus: These flowering plants in the iris family and native to woodland, scrub, and meadows from sea level to alpine tundra.

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{3} Hyacinths: A small bulb flowering plant with dense clusters of blooms.  Hyacinths are highly fragrant with blooms that look like miniature starfishes.

7e24b54f4632f5e17483a2eabe60f35a{4} Daffodils: These hardy, spring-flowering bulbs are beautiful for indoors and outdoors.  Each flower has a central bell surrounded by six petals.  Flower color varies from white through yellow to deep orange.

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{5} Azalea: A flowering shrub with blooms often lasting several weeks. Shade tolerant, they are great for enjoying indoors.  With blooms of white, shades of pink, purple, and even red, the plants are available in a variety of shapes and sizes to complement any garden or home.

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{6} Easter Lily: These stem rooting lilies can growing up to 3 feet high.  Each plant bears multiple trumpet shaped, outward facing flowers.  The white blooms are well known for their white color and fragrance.

Robin’s Garden

We’re excited to have one of our own designers, Robin, as a guest blogger this week. She will be sharing information on one of her many passions, gardening:

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My yard in Spring is like an out of control, multicolored soiree. The flora and fauna go from stark to lush in 2 days of sunshine. There are old friends arriving, new guests from who knows where, no shows and the inevitable unwanted guests usually in creeping weed form. The house and multitude of chores inside must wait until October now, for the real party has begun outside.

In all this chaos we must remember not to rush out of the gate prematurely and that there may be better times to plant or prune certain species. There is no blanket rule for your pruning duties. So don’t get Edward Scissor Hands on your shrubs without researching your specific variety and it’s tailored needs.  For example, some hydrangea varieties are best to be pruned when you can decipher new and old growth by swelling buds in Spring.  The buds of some plants have set themselves in fall and by pruning at the wrong time you will cut off any potential flowers. Our cold, windy winters prove to be too much for some deeply pruned and hallow Hydrangea stems. A light prune just to shape the plant is always safest until you know for sure.

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Be careful raking too early, “your roots are showing” isn’t just something of a coiffure slam, but your actual lawn has tender shallow roots in the early spring. By raking too soon you will rip and damage that manicured lawn you are striving for and eventually killing with kindness. If you unsightly stalks or clumps of leaves, just pick them up by hand until we have more consecutively warm days and the grass has started flourishing.

Some other fun spring tidbits that will help you out is to be patient. You may have received a beautiful bulb garden basket this past Easter or even for Mother’s day. The best treatment for the bulbs after they have bloomed is to trim the dead flower stem off and allow the foliage to run its course and eventually wilt. After wilted, place the container in a cool, dark, dry place for the summer. In late fall after temperatures drop, is the perfect time to place them in the ground with a little fertilizer/ bone meal (follow the instructions about depth. (Not too shallow!)  The bulbs should pop up in the spring and be back on their “normal” schedule.

Last but not least, I will single out my favorite spring flower. The true sign of new beginnings, the flower of Wales and the most resilient of the bulbs, the Daffodil. Ever since Narcissus drowned in that pool of water after being so taken with his own beautiful reflection, the plant has had many myths surrounding it. Animals instinctively know not to eat the poisonous plant. The sap has sharp crystals of calcium oxalate that may irritate your skin and are poisonous. However, it is fine to place Daffodils in a vase of mixed flowers as long as the water is changed daily. There is nothing better than to see a few simple stems of their happy yellow faces peeking out from your favorite vase.

Tick-tock, Spring time is fleeting in Rochester, Ny so go out and enjoy the fresh, new pallet of your space and the pride in last year’s good planning.